Air Mechanical, Inc. Blog: Posts Tagged ‘leaky faucet’

Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Ignore a Leaky Kitchen Sink

Monday, June 10th, 2019

Whether you use it for cooking, cleaning, or drinking, your kitchen sink is pushed to the limit every single day. We often take for granted just how much our kitchen sinks can endure, and throughout the course of a day, we turn them on and off about a zillion times! But, all this repeated use can quickly create problems in the faucet mechanism, leading to that steady, annoying, drip, drip, drip, drip…

If your kitchen sink has started leaking, it is important that you contact a local plumber right away! Although the dripping may not seem like too big a deal, it can easily cause significant damage to your home, property, and your wallet! And in case you aren’t yet convinced, we have listed some of the reasons why you shouldn’t ignore your leaky kitchen sink below. Keep reading to find out more.

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Plumbing Repair Tip: How Much Water Does a Leaky Faucet Waste?

Monday, September 17th, 2012

A leaky faucet can be a real annoyance. The rate at which the drips come out can determine how much water you are actually losing on a given day, week, or even year. For a home that has one leaky faucet which drips only once a minute, that is the equivalent of 1,440 times a day. Although it may not seem like a significant number, over the course of a year that single drip will equal 34 gallons.

If you happen to have two leaky faucets in your Ham Lake home which each drip on average 10 times a minute, you will be losing over a gallon of water a day from each, or over 694 gallons a year. Many faulty faucets can drip much more often than that, even up to a drip a second. When this happens, one faucet alone can cost you five gallons a day or 2,082 gallons a year.

If you’re interested in just how much water your home is losing due to one or more leaky faucets, there is a great website that will calculate it for you. The U.S. Geologic Survey has a quick drip calculator anyone can use to figure it out. What may seem like a little, insignificant drip can wind up being a lot of wasted water and money, literally going right down the drain.

In addition to losing water and increasing your water bill, this wasted water can have a negative impact on the environment, especially for people living in areas with drier climates or places that haven’t gotten as much rainfall as normal. When water isn’t conserved or is wasted, the supply can’t be replenished and the entire ecosystem will suffer as a result.

To save you both the annoyance and increased cost on your water and energy bills, call an Ham Lake plumber at Air Mechanical to come and fix the problem or install a new faucet. Leaky faucets are usually a quick fix that can end up saving you money the minute they quit dripping.

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How Much Water Does a Leaky Faucet Waste?

Monday, July 4th, 2011

A leaky faucet is obnoxious for more than one reason. It is incessant, it represents a problem that will probably only grow worse, and it can cost you money on your water bill. Beyond all of that, it wastes a lot of water, putting undue stress on the environment. But, how much water does a leaky faucet actually waste? It may not seem like much, but when added up over a period of time, that leaky faucet’s impact can be fairly substantial.

Okay, so a single drip every couple seconds may not seem like a lot of water. But, think about it this way. If you let your faucet drip every day, twenty four hours a day, it is definitely going to add up. Imagine what would happen if every faucet in your home was dripping or every faucet in your neighbourhood. It would not seem like such a small amount of water anymore.

In terms of how much water is actually wasted, it is impossible to tell for certain. After all, every drop of water from a faucet is a different size and falls at a different rate. But, for the most part the water coming from a faucet (according to the US Geological Survey) is between 1/5 and 1/3 of one milliliter. Using those calculations and 1/4 of a milliliter as an average, the USGS estimates that roughly 15,140 drips from a faucet equals one gallon of water.

It may not seem like much. After all, fifteen thousand drops is a LOT of drops. But, if your faucet dripped once every second every day, all day, it would only take four and a half hours to reach one gallon. Every day you would waste 5 gallons of water or 2,082 gallons per year. That is 10% of the average water used by a standard 3.5 gpf toilet on a daily basis. Now, imagine what happens if you have more than one drippy faucet, or if your bathtub leaks which will drip more water at a time or if the leak is larger than the average size.

In short, the cost of a leaky faucet may not seem like much, but as time passes, it can really add up and if it is not taken care of, the cost will only grow as the leak gets bigger and potentially new leaks start in other faucets of your home. Do not let it drip forever – take action now and cut down on the environmental impact you have, as well as your bill.

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