Air Mechanical, Inc. Blog: Posts Tagged ‘Spring Lake Park’

3 Problems with Gas Piping That Require Repair

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

Gas piping is used with your furnace, hot water heater and similar appliances, bringing natural gas into your home to provide fuel for heating. Gas piping in Spring Lake Park is very common, and usually quite reliable to boot. But like any other appliance, gas piping can run into trouble from time to time. When they do, you need to call in a professional to handle it. Here are 3 problems with gas piping that require repair.

At Air Mechanical Inc. we professionally handle gas piping in Spring Lake Park and throughout the surrounding communities, and we’re dedicated to your complete satisfaction!

  • Leaks. Leaks in your gas line don’t happen very often, but when they do they constitute a serious danger to your home: not only can they poison you or your family members, but they could result in an explosion. Natural gas is normally odorless, which is why a specific scent, like rotting eggs, is added. If you smell it, you need to turn off the gas and call a repair technician immediately. If possible, clear your home of all pets and family members, and refrain from doing anything involving open flame, such as turning on a gas range or lighting up a cigarette.
  • Blocks. Blockages in your gas piping can be caused by contaminants in the line, damage to the pipe or a build-up of gunk at the access point. Regardless of the exact cause, the result is the same: the gas won’t flow and the appliance relying on it will not function. In some cases, it might not entirely restrict the flow of gas, but merely slow it down.
  • Valve issues. Valves at the end of a gas line can result in either leaks or blocks, depending on the exact nature of the issue. The good news is that they’re fairly easy to replace, but as with other repair issues, you need to address the issue immediately in order to avoid real trouble.

If you encounter problems with gas piping that require repair, keep your home and family safe, first by evacuating the house, and then contact the gas company. Once they have allowed people back into the house, call the experts at Air Mechanical, Inc.

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The Hardest HVAC Maintenance: A Guide from a Shoreview Heating Contractor

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

Do you hate to work on your own mechanical equipment in your Shoreview home, like furnaces and plumbing fixtures? You aren’t alone. Many people are not cut out to be do-it-yourselfers (DIYers). They prefer to hand off their maintenance and repair chores to Shoreview contractor. That’s not a bad thing. But there are lots of DIYers who prefer to work on their own home repairs – and those are the people who aren’t afraid to take on the most challenging jobs.

If you are looking for good ideas on how to maintain your home’s heating and cooling (HVAC) system beyond the normal filter changeouts, here are some good things to check – things that will help with the overall performance of your HVAC system.

  1. Check the ventilation system. The ventilation carries conditioned air from a main source throughout your home.  It takes a little time and effort to check your ventilation system for things like cracks or leaks around joints, but it is an important maintenance task. You may even find separations between joints or holes caused by nails. A leaky ventilation system could be sending conditioned air into attics, walls, or crawlspaces and making your furnace work extra hard just to keep your living areas warm and comfortable. Take time to visually inspect as much of your ventilation system as possible – usually metal or flex duct – and repair using joint glue, metal filler, or duct tape.
  2. Inspect the insulation. Your heating system works in conjunction with the insulation in your home to provide comfort and warmth while saving you on high utility bills. A home that is poorly insulated or not insulated at all will cause a furnace to work harder and not only send utility bills higher, but increase the possibility of mechanical failure. Replacing or adding insulation in walls and crawlspaces is a relatively easy, yet time-consuming task. You can roll down or tack up fiber insulation or blow in insulation into walls. You can also seal up cracks on your home’s walls, roof, or foundation with a number of different products. Once again, your goal is to make your heating system work less and save you money.
  3. Check the visible components of the furnace. A build-up of dust and dirt can make the moving components of your furnace work even harder, such as the motors, fan belts, contactors, etc. If you live in an area where there is lots of dust and humidity or if your home has several occupants and/or animals, it is particularly important to check your system on a regular basis. This can be done by removing the access panels and taking a vacuum cleaner hose into as many areas as possible. A good, thorough vacuuming should produce immediate results and make your furnace run much more efficiently.

Try these three steps and you may not have to repeat them for another year or so – possibly not ever again while you live in your home.

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How Does a Heat Pump Work? A Question from Roseville

Monday, October 17th, 2011

If you’re in the market for a new home heating and cooling system in Roseville, a heat pump is definitely an option worth considering. However, while the popularity of these systems is growing rapidly, many people still don’t understand what they’re all about. Before you go out and get yourself a new home comfort system, you should make sure you really know what you’re looking at.

As their name suggests, heat pumps move heat from one location to another. However, their name can be misleading as well. Heat pumps are able to both heat your home in the winter and keep it cool in the summer by taking heat from the air in one place and sending it to another.

For example, your heat pump will remove the heat from your indoor air in the summer and pump it outside to keep your home cool. In the winter, the process is reversed, and the heat pump gathers heat from the outdoor air and pumps it inside to keep you house warm.

Of course, it’s not hard to see how the air inside your home in the summer has heat in it. But the outdoor air in the winter is cold. So how does a heat pump heat your house with cold air? Well, the truth is that there is almost always some heat in the air, no matter how cold it seems to you and me.

In fact, the temperature would have to drop well into the negative range before there was absolutely no heat to be found in the air. And heat pumps are specially designed to find that heat and collect it.

Basically all heat pumps work on this principle. However, they can’t keep your house comfortable all on their own. Heat pumps are usually installed as part of a complete home heating and cooling system. This means they’ll be paired with an air handler that can circulate the temperature controlled air throughout the house.

There are also some heat pumps that supplement the amount of heat they’re able to pull out of the air by heating it as it passes through. These types of heat pumps are often more effective in cooler areas, but because they require more energy to actually generate heat, they’re not typically as energy efficient as models that rely on their ability to get heat only out of the air.

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How Can You Improve Your Home’s Air Quality? A Question From Circle Pines

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

One of the easiest ways to protect the health of your family is by maintaining high air quality in your Circle Pines home. Without good air quality, you run the risk of contracting Sick Building Syndrome or making other problems like allergies or asthma worse. Depending on what type of air quality system you already have in place, there are many things you can do to improve your air quality.

Filter Changes

The easiest way to improve air quality is to maintain the equipment you already have. Specifically, change your filters regularly. Filters each have a specified period of time for which they will last. However, if your home has high levels of larger contaminants like pollen and dander, you may need to change your filter more often.

Beyond filter changes, make sure your filtration device uses high quality HEPA filters, capable of stopping debris as small as 0.3 microns.

Cleaning Your Ducts and Equipment

Another easy way to reduce the load on your air quality system without paying for new filters every two months is to clean the equipment and the ducts in your house. Ductwork quickly gets clogged with dirt, dust, and other debris being blown by your furnace and air conditioner. If you have a boiler and radiant heat system this is less of an issue, but you should still check your air vents and any air conditioner units in your house for excess dirt and debris buildup.

Your air quality equipment should have a specified timeline for regular cleanings – usually every six months to one year depending on the size and quality of the equipment. A lot of this cleaning can be done by you, but for advanced cleaning or parts replacement, you may need a professional.

New Equipment

Finally, you can buy new equipment that does a better job of removing contaminants from your indoor air. If you have only a simple air filter, consider getting a purifier as well to remove other contaminants like smoke and gas. If you have a smaller piece of equipment that works well but longer keeps up with the entire house, there are larger purifiers on the market that can handle a bigger space. Additionally, proper ventilation can help with your indoor air quality if you don’t currently have enough fresh air circulating through your home.

No matter what your problem, there is a solution you can work toward to keep the indoor air quality of your home high.

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