Air Mechanical, Inc. Blog: Posts Tagged ‘Water Softener’

Here’s What You Need to Know About Hard Water

Sunday, May 26th, 2019

When you think about all the things that could go wrong with your plumbing system, you likely picture burst pipes, clogged toilets, and leaky faucets, however, there is one issue that homeowners almost always overlook: hard water. Hard water is one of the most common and most problematic issues that your plumbing system can face, yet many of us are unaware that we’ve got a problem.

Therefore, it is important to know about hard water systems and what you can do to keep your plumbing system in the best possible condition. So below, we have outlined some of the things you ought to know about hard water. Keep reading to find out more!

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How a Water Softener Protects Your Home

Monday, July 11th, 2016

The goal of many water filtration, conditioning, and purification products is to clean out contaminants that could make people sick. A water softener is a little different. Most of what it removes from your water supply would not make you sick. But it can still protect many parts of your home from the effects of hard water.

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Do You Have Hard Water? Know the Signs

Monday, February 29th, 2016

You may have heard someone complain about the effects of hard water before. Maybe they were upset about the streaks hard water leaves behind on the shower door. Maybe they believed that the quality of the water actually affected the taste of their food. The fact is that hard water takes on many characteristics, but the worst symptom is the one you can’t see.

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How a Water Softener Protects Your Plumbing

Monday, November 2nd, 2015

You may have heard someone complain about the effects of “hard water” before. Some people claim that if the water they use to wash their hair is what’s known as hard water, it makes their hair feel dry and brittle. Others claim it dries out the skin, while some say it makes a difference in the quality of their cooking.

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Signs that You Have Hard Water in Apple Valley

Monday, December 26th, 2011

Hard water is fairly common, especially in certain regions of the country. It is called hard water because of the minerals in it, such as calcium, iron and lime. Depending on how “hard” the water is, it’s usually perfectly healthy, but can cause some other problems throughout your Apple Valley home.

Hard water can negatively affect the durability of household appliances like dishwashers and washing machines, as well as pipes and fixtures throughout the home. How do you know if you have hard water? Here are some common signs and symptoms to be on the lookout for:

  1. A white, scaly, filmy residue left behind on plumbing fixtures. In particular, you may notice these on showerheads, on stainless fixtures like the basin of your kitchen sink, on your silverware or in the coffee pot.
  2. Clothes that are not getting as clean as they should in the laundry. This is because hard water is less effective at washing away dirt. Likewise, you may notice soap scum residue in your tub or shower.
  3. Little or no lather from shampoo or soap while showering.
  4. A reddish tinge to hair over time. This is due to iron in the water that can temporarily change hair color in the shower.
  5. Water takes a long time to heat, or heating costs that are higher than usual. This is because hard water requires more heat than water with fewer minerals in it.
  6. A foul odor emanating from your water.

If you notice any of these signs, or a combination of them, you may have hard water. There are certain things you can do to control the effects of hard water, such as using a commercial mineral remover to dissolve deposits left on showerheads and other fixtures. Vinegar also works well.

However, the best thing to do is to treat hard water so that it does not damage your plumbing system. A licensed Apple Valley plumber can help you do this by adding water softener to your water supply, among other treatments. These are things that need to be done on an ongoing basis, but will help extend the life of your expensive appliances and plumbing system.

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How a Water Softener Works

Friday, June 17th, 2011

You use water for many things. It is necessary for bathing, cooking, washing clothes and for drinking. But the water we use in our homes is not pure. It has plenty of other minerals and additives suspended inside. While some of these, like fluoride, are intentionally added to the water supplies in certain areas, some others get in by chance.

Aside from actual pollutants, the additives you may be the most concerned about finding in your water are calcium and magnesium. These minerals are picked up by water as it moves through the ground, and the more of them that get into your home water supply, the harder that water will be.

The term hard water is used to describe water with high levels of calcium and magnesium present. These minerals are not actually dangerous to us, but they can cause all sorts of problems for your indoor plumbing and other household systems. For instance, hard water will leave deposits of these minerals on the insides of pipes and on sinks, faucets and bathtubs.

Residue will also build up in appliances like coffee makers, dish washers and washing machines. Over time these buildups can become a real problem and you may have to pay for costly repairs or need to replace large appliances.

In order to avoid these types of complications, your best bet is to have a water softener installed. These systems can be connected directly to your home water source and they are able to remove excess calcium and magnesium from the water before it ever reaches any of your indoor plumbing or appliances.

Water softeners generally remove these minerals by attracting the positively charged calcium and magnesium particles with a tank full of negatively charged polystyrene particles. In this system, the calcium and magnesium are replaced by sodium ions as they move through the water softener, thereby maintaining the overall balanced composition of the water. Once the water has passed through and the calcium and magnesium have been left behind, the water softener will flush them out and prepare to absorb another wave of hard water minerals.

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