Air Mechanical, Inc. Blog : Posts Tagged ‘Plymouth’

Here’s Why You Should Install a Furnace

Monday, April 1st, 2019

There’s a reason they are the most popular choice for home heating in the country. Furnaces are excellent heaters and have been providing homeowners with comfort and efficiency for decades. Especially here in Minnesota, you need a great heater to get you through the cold, bitter winters, and a furnace can do just that!

There are a number of reasons why you should consider installing a furnace in your home. Furnaces offer numerous benefits and are great for providing warmth and comfort. Below, we have listed just some of the many reasons as to why you should install a furnace in your home. If you are in the market for a new heater this year, you should definitely keep reading!

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Here’s What Makes Zone Control Awesome

Monday, March 18th, 2019

With winter well underway, and with no early signs of spring yet, it is probably safe to say that you are going to be using your heater quite a bit over the next few weeks. So, why not strive to get the most out of it by making your home as energy efficient as possible? When your home is energy efficient, you’ll spend less time worrying about costly HVAC repairs and sky-high energy, and instead, enjoy the warmth and comfort your heater has to offer.

Of course, ensuring that your home is energy efficient is a great way to save money from month to month. So, how do get there? Well, installing a zone control system is a great way to maximize your heater’s efficiency and performance. So, if your home heating in Plymouth, MN could use a boost, contact a professional who can determine if zone control is right for you. And be sure to keep reading below!

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How You Benefit from Whole-Home Surge Protection

Monday, November 26th, 2018

Are you keeping your home safe? Think past home security systems, locks, and secure windows—are you safe in the face of disaster? We experience extreme weather conditions here in Minnesota, so you need to make sure your home is prepared in for anything life throws your way. So much of your home runs on your electricity—make sure you can still have access to these faculties in a bind.

The best way to protect your home from damage is to remain proactive. You need whole-home surge protection in Plymouth, MN, and we can provide the best services for you in the area. Contact our team today to schedule an appointment.

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Plumbing Repair Tip: How Much Water Does a Leaky Faucet Waste?

Monday, September 17th, 2012

A leaky faucet can be a real annoyance. The rate at which the drips come out can determine how much water you are actually losing on a given day, week, or even year. For a home that has one leaky faucet which drips only once a minute, that is the equivalent of 1,440 times a day. Although it may not seem like a significant number, over the course of a year that single drip will equal 34 gallons.

If you happen to have two leaky faucets in your Ham Lake home which each drip on average 10 times a minute, you will be losing over a gallon of water a day from each, or over 694 gallons a year. Many faulty faucets can drip much more often than that, even up to a drip a second. When this happens, one faucet alone can cost you five gallons a day or 2,082 gallons a year.

If you’re interested in just how much water your home is losing due to one or more leaky faucets, there is a great website that will calculate it for you. The U.S. Geologic Survey has a quick drip calculator anyone can use to figure it out. Go to http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/sc4.html and plug in the numbers for yourself. What may seem like a little, insignificant drip can wind up being a lot of wasted water and money, literally going right down the drain.

In addition to losing water and increasing your water bill, this wasted water can have a negative impact on the environment, especially for people living in areas with drier climates or places that haven’t gotten as much rainfall as normal. When water isn’t conserved or is wasted, the supply can’t be replenished and the entire ecosystem will suffer as a result.

To save you both the annoyance and increased cost on your water and energy bills, call an Ham Lake plumber at Air Mechanical to come and fix the problem or install a new faucet. Leaky faucets are usually a quick fix that can end up saving you money the minute they quit dripping.

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Rosemount HVAC Experts Q/A: What Is Geothermal Heating?

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Having a geothermal heating system installed in your Rosemount residence means that you will actually be able to heat your home with heat extracted from the ground. If this sounds a bit preposterous to you, you are certainly not alone. But this type of home heating does actually work and the technology is not actually that much different from what is used in a standard heat pump system.

Regular heat pumps are able to remove heat from the outdoor air and transfer it into your house to maintain a comfortable temperature in the winter. You may think that there is no heat in the outdoor air in the winter, but that is not actually the case.

Air contains a substantial amount of heat even at very cold temperatures, and heat pumps are able to work quite well, particularly when the outdoor temperature is above freezing. Conveniently, the same process used to heat your house in the winter can be reversed in the summer to extract heat from the indoor air, providing you with a year round home comfort solution.

Geothermal heating works in much the same way, except that geothermal heat pumps extract heat from the ground rather than the air. In order to accomplish this, a loop of pipes is installed in the ground near your house and your geothermal heating system will pump a liquid, generally either antifreeze or water, through those pipes.

As it passes through the pipes, the liquid will absorb heat from the ground and carry it back to a heat exchanger within your house. At that point, the heat from the liquid will be released into air, which is then blown throughout your house.

And just as conventional heat pumps can cool your house in the summer by removing heat and pumping it outside, so too can geothermal heating systems. They do this simply by letting the liquid flowing through the pipes absorb the heat from inside air and then release it into the ground as it travels through the pipe loop below your house.

Because the ground is never as cold in the winter or as hot in the summer as the air, geothermal heat pumps are actually able to work effectively in more extreme conditions than many traditional heat pumps. However, because they require an entire system of pipes to be installed underground, they can be quite a bit more expensive initially as well.

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How a Furnace Works: A Guide from Champlin

Friday, November 11th, 2011

Do you know how your furnace works? Believe it or not, lots of Champlin homeowners probably can’t explain the operation of furnace. It probably isn’t at the top of your “to do” list. It’s only important to know that once you set your thermostat to a desired temperature, the furnace comes on and warms the house.

The most common furnace is fueled by natural gas but there are other examples of heating equipment such as boilers, electric baseboard, or geothermal. But let’s look at how a gas furnace works since natural gas is found in most U.S. households. Gas furnaces use natural gas or propane to provide energy used for generating heat.

When the temperature in your home falls below the level set on the thermostat, an electric pilot light automatically ignites to heat a burner inside the furnace. This burner uses gas to generate heat within a combustion chamber inside the furnace. After the furnace senses that the thermostat has triggered the flame and that it is properly lit, the actual spark (or ignitor) is turned off.

Simultaneously, a motor in the furnace pulls in air from an exchange or return, which could be a grill in the floor, ceiling, or wall of a house. That air flows through ducts into the plenum of the furnace. The plenum is on the opposite side of the heat exchanger from the burner.

Gas will typically burn for at least two minutes before the blower starts to disperse heat throughout your home. This extra time gives the air an adequate period of time to warm up and also so that cold air won’t be pushed through the vents into the rooms in your house at the start. After either the preset time (roughly two minutes) or pre-established temperature is reached, the blower’s motor is turned on and it blows air over the heat exchanger, which usually consists of a series of copper tubes or pipes. When a fan blows air onto the heat exchanger, the air is heated. This heated air is then blown through a series of ducts to heat your home via vents in the floor, walls or ceiling. Exhaust fumes from the combustion process exit the furnace through a gas flue or chimney.

Just as the heat in your home turns on when a certain temperature is reached, it also turns off after the rooms are warm enough, thanks to your thermostat. The thermostat again senses the temperature in the room. When the room warms up to the temperature set by you at the thermostat, the gas valve is switched off, stopping the flow of gas. After the gas is turned off, the blower motor will still run for a few minutes, allowing the heat exchanger to cool off a bit. In some furnaces, the blower motor never shuts off, but operates at low speed to keep air circulating throughout your home.

In a nutshell, your thermostat is the brain in your heating system and your furnace is the brawn, doing most of the work.

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Furnace vs. Heat Pump: Some Pointers from Golden Valley

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

If you’re preparing to replace your existing heating system in your Golden Valley home, you may very well be struggling with the question of whether to go with a furnace or a heat pump for your future home heating needs. Each of these systems have their own advantages and drawbacks, and once you’ve narrowed it down to one type or the other, you’ll still have a pretty wide variety of products to choose from.

Furnaces are still the most popular type of home heating equipment on the market. You can get furnaces that run on gas, oil or electricity, although gas furnaces are by far the most common type of furnace around these days. The latest models are extremely energy efficient, with AFUE ratings reaching into the high 90%s.

Like heat pumps, furnaces use ducts to transfer heated air throughout your home. They typically require regular maintenance once every year or two depending on the type of furnace you have, and they can be expected to last anywhere from 15 to 25 years when properly maintained. Most modern furnaces are also made to be compatible with a central air conditioning or cooling system as well.

Heat pumps, on the other hand, don’t generate the heat that they circulate throughout your house. Instead they are able to extract the heat from the air outside and pump it inside. This means that they use much less energy than even the most energy efficient furnaces.

However, heat pumps are only capable of heating your house comfortably when the outside temperature is above freezing. If you live in an area with particularly long and frigid winters, you’ll probably find that you need to supplement your heat pump with another heat source. Because of this, it actually makes little sense to use a heat pump in more extreme climates.

On the other hand, if you live in an area with relatively mild winters, heat pumps can be a great option. They provide a constant flow of warm air to all parts of your home and can also keep you house cool during hot summer months. To cool your home, heat pumps simply reverse the process they use to warm it. They take the heat out of your indoor air and pump it outside. This is a very effective home cooling method and makes heat pumps a great solution for year round comfort.

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What Should You Do if Your Furnace Fan Doesn’t Run? (and Happy Halloween Weekend!)

Friday, October 28th, 2011

Everyone at Air Mechanical wishes you a Happy Halloween weekend! We hope you have a great time dressing up and eating lots of candy! And today we are sharing with you what to do if a scary situation happens: your furnace fan stops running.

There are several reasons that a furnace fan might stop working at one point or another. While many of these do require professional attention, there are probably some things you can check on your own before you go and call in the pros. After all, if you can address the problem on your own, it will at least save you from having to pay a technician to come out.

The first thing to check when your furnace is running but the fan isn’t turning is whether or not the fan is actually switched on. Certain models of furnaces have a separate switch to turn the fan on and off. While there is probably no reason that you would want to turn off the fan by itself, it’s worth taking a look just in case. If that really is the problem, you’ll be up and running and back to dealing with better things in no time.

If that’s not the problem, you might try looking to see if any wires leading to the fan are loose or the fuse is blown. If the fan has no power, of course, it won’t be able to work but the rest of the furnace likely would work just fine as long as it doesn’t run on electricity as well.

Of course, the problem very well may be beyond your power to solve on your own. Don’t despair though. Even though you need to call in a professional, that doesn’t mean that the problem will be expensive to fix. In fact, it may be as simple as replacing your thermostat or the motor for the fan itself.

Just because a fan isn’t working doesn’t mean that you’re going to be paying an arm and a leg to have work done on your furnace. If you can’t easily discover the problem on your own, however, or if you’re not comfortable inspecting this type of equipment at all, you’re generally better off just calling in an expert and letting them do the dirty work for you. Paying for simple furnace fan repairs is definitely preferable to having to pay someone to fix the fan and the stuff you broke yourself while trying to fix the fan on your own.

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